How light therapy works in the body

Light therapy is intended for people whp suffer from sleep problems or even seasonal affective disorder (SAD– a depression brought on by the colder months), and now scientists may have a better idea of how it affects the body.

When Japanese scientist exposed mice to bright light, the animals experienced a wave of hormones called glucocorticoids. These hormones are responsible for many bodily processes, including your metabolism, your response to stress, inflammation, and immunity.

The process started in the mice’s brain, where the reseatchers focused on an area that is deeply involved in the internal “body clock”, called the suprachiasmatic nucleous.

The results of experiments might help explain light therapy’s benefits for SAD patients and those suffering from other types of depression.

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How light therapy works in the body

Light therapy is intended for people whp suffer from sleep problems or even seasonal affective disorder (SAD– a depression brought on by the colder months), and now scientists may have a better idea of how it affects the body.

When Japanese scientist exposed mice to bright light, the animals experienced a wave of hormones called glucocorticoids. These hormones are responsible for many bodily processes, including your metabolism, your response to stress, inflammation, and immunity.

The process started in the mice’s brain, where the reseatchers focused on an area that is deeply involved in the internal “body clock”, called the suprachiasmatic nucleous.

The results of experiments might help explain light therapy’s benefits for SAD patients and those suffering from other types of depression.

Leave a Reply

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